The Best Italian Wines

The Best Italian Wines

Italy is the world leader in the production of wine, especially fine wine. But which are the best Italian wines? Responding to this question is really quite difficult: to speak of a definitive ranking system is challenging because in Italy the tendency for wine producers is to improve continuously, day after day, and even within classifications new wines often rise to prominence.

How to acquaint yourself with the best Italian wines

Delving into the world of Italian wine is a rich experience, but it requires a few reference points and/or a valid guide. The guide can be a valuable support to learn more about this world, discovering the areas of origin, the DOC and the vines that are cultivated here. The best Italian wines become exciting protagonists in this discovery, and unforgettable when they are correctly matched with the best of Italian cuisine.
Some guides and gastronomic websites recommend a wine selection
in order to stand out from the chosen dish.
Alcune guide e siti web della Gastronomia, consigliano una rosa di vini proprio a partire dalla pietanza scelta.
Italy is one of the largest producers of fine wines, often DOC or DOCG classified. Amongst the most important production areas of Italian wines that deserve to be mentioned are Langhe in Piedmont; Valpolicella in Veneto; and Chianti Classico, Montalcino and Bolgheri in Tuscany, where in addition to these prestigious names Supertuscans are also produced, a category much appreciated both in Italy and abroad.
Every region of Italy is noteworthy – think of Sicily, Sardinia, Trentino, Alto Adige and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, just to name a few – and it is almost impossible to draw up a ranking by region.
There are many Italian wines and varieties appreciated in Italy and around the world, mostly red: one must begin with Brunello di Montalcino and Chianti Classico, both from Tuscany, then Barolo and Barbaresco from Piedmont; but there are also lesser known wines, which are often amongst the top best Italian wines in the world. This is the case for the Tuscan denominations of Bolgheri Superiore DOC and Tignanello IGT, Pergole Torte IGT and Flaccianello della Pieve IGT. These last three can be placed in the Supertuscan category, high quality wines produced outside of the specifications of a DOC.
When discussing the most important Tuscan wines one can’t help but mention those produced by Marchesi de’ Frescobladi; wines of great character such as Mormoreto, Brunello di Montelcino CastelGiocondo and Nipozzano Riserva Chianti Rufina. Frescobaldi is a Florentine family dedicated to the production of wine for thirty generations and many of its products fall into the elite group of the best Italian wines known and appreciated in the world.
With the goal of being the most prestigious wine producers, and one of the best representatives of Italian wines, Marchesi de’ Frescobaldi firmly believes in respecting each territory and aims to enhance the offerings of each individual estate through a dedicated team of highly experienced agronomists and enologists.
Marchesi de’ Frecobaldi’s beginnings as a wine producer are documented in early 1300s, at the historic Tenuta di Castiglioni in Val di Pesa, south-west of Florence. Marchesi de’ Frescobaldi wines come from 700 years of passion, experience and love for a territory: Tuscany, which has become the ideal cradle of the highest quality wines.
All over Italy many noteworthy wines are produced, starting with the numerous indigenous grape varieties that the “renaissance” of Italian enology is helping to rediscover.
Here is a list of a few of the best Italian wines divided by region:

  • Aosta Valley – Enfer d’Arvier & Moscato di Chambave
  • Piedmonte – Barolo, Barbaresco & Gattinara
  • Liguria – Cinque terre & Rossese di Dolceacqua
  • Lombardy – Franciacorta & Valtellina
  • Trentino-Alto Adige – Gewurztraminer Alto Adige & Trento classico
  • Veneto – Amarone della Valpolicella & Conegliano Valdobbiadene- Prosecco
  • Friuli – Collio Sauvignon & Collio Ribolla Gialla
  • Emilia-Romagna – Lambrusco di Sorbara & Albana di Romagna
  • Tuscany – Chianti Classico, Brunello di Montalcino e & Bolgheri Superiore
  • Umbria -Montefalco Sagrantino & Torgiano
  • Marche – Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi & Rosso Piceno
  • Lazio – Frascati Superiore & Cesanese del Piglio
  • Abruzzoi – Montepulciano d’Abruzzo & Trebbiano d’Abruzzo
  • Molise -Biferno & Pentro
  • Campania – Taurasi & Fiano di Avellino
  • Apulia – ICastel del Monte & Salice Salentino
  • Basilicata – Aglianico del Vulture, the undisputed star of the region
  • Calabria – Cirò & Greco di Bianco
  • Siciliy – Etna Rosso & Marsala Vergine
  • Sardinia – Vermentino di Gallura & Cannonau di Sardegna